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Donation Process

Donor safety is our top priority.

Donor Safety & Requirements

Safety Matters

When you arrive at your local donor center you will be greeted by our donor care specialist team who will guide you throughout your donation journey. You can rest assured that your donation will be performed by our knowledgeable staff of registered nurses and phlebotomists under the direction of a licensed physician. Donor safety is our number one priority!

All donations involve complete anonymity, and you will receive compensation for your time and generosity.

Take a look at our eligibility requirements, go step-by-step through the donation process, or view our FAQs for quick answers to any questions you may have.

Eligibility Requirements

Do’s

  1. Be in good health and feeling well
  2. Be at least 18 years old
  3. Weigh at least 110 pounds
  4. Possess a valid government-issued photo ID (Example: Driver’s License, Military ID, etc.)

Don’ts

  1. Are not pregnant or breast feeding
  2. Have been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B, or Hepatitis C
  3. Have ever used needles to take drugs, steroids, or anything not prescribed by your doctor
  4. Are a male who has had sexual contact with another male, even once, since 1977
  5. Have ever taken money, drugs, or any other form of payment for sex since 1977
  6. Have had sexual contact in the past 12 months with anyone described above
  7. Have had syphilis or gonorrhea in the past 12 months
  8. In the past 12 months have been in juvenile detention, lockup, jail, or prison for more than 72 hours
  9. Have lived in, or visited the United Kingdom, which includes England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Mann, or Channel Islands from 1980-1996 for a total of 3 months or more
  10. Have spent 5 years or more (total) in Europe since 1980
  11. Have visited a malarial-endemic country within the last year
Ask About Our Referral
Program
Receive up to $50.00 for referring
friends & family members

Types of Donations

Whole blood is comprised of four main components: plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

Appointment Time: Approximately 2 hours

Donation Process: Whole blood is collected from an arm vein and is performed by a nurse or phlebotomist.

A nurse or phlebotomist will cleanse and sterilize an area of the arm from which the blood will be drawn. Blood may be collected into tubes by needle or into a donation bag through sterile tubing. The entire blood collection procedure takes about 5-20 minutes while approximately one pint of blood is collected. All materials used during the donation are pre-packaged, sterile, and disposable. Once used, it is thrown away and destroyed.

Compensation: Up to $150

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found within the hollow interior of long bones such as the hip and thigh bones. The bone marrow contains stems cells that produce the body’s blood cells, which include white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.

Appointment Time: Approximately 2 hours

Donation Process: Bone marrow is removed from the pelvic bone and is performed by a licensed healthcare practitioner.

Donors are positioned on their belly and receive anesthesia to feel comfortable during their donation. Liquid marrow is withdrawn from the back of the pelvic bone using a hollow needle. As the liquid marrow is removed, donors may experience a brief period of minimal to moderate discomfort. The entire procedure, once preparation is complete, typically takes 10–15 minutes.

Compensation: Up to $300

White blood cells are one of the four main components of whole blood; red blood cells, platelets, and plasma make up the other three components. White blood cells are the body’s primary defense against infection, they have the ability to move out of the blood stream and reach tissue being invaded.

Appointment Time: Approximately 3-4 hours

Donation Process: White blood cells, particularly the mononuclear type of white blood cells, are collected from an arm vein by leukapheresis.

Leukapheresis is the process of removing whole blood from the donor, separating the blood into its components, keeping the white blood cells, and then returning the remaining blood components to the donor.

A nurse or phlebotomist will cleanse and sterilize an area of the arm from which the blood will be drawn. The blood is sent through sterile tubing into a centrifuge located in a cell-separator machine. The machine spins the blood to separate the white blood cells from the other components. The white blood cells are collected, and the remaining components are returned via the other arm. Only a small portion of blood is in the machine at any time (less than a cup). The entire procedure may take approximately 4 hours and is not uncomfortable.

Compensation: Up to $300

White blood cells are one of the four main components of whole blood; red blood cells, platelets, and plasma make up the other three components. Mobilized white blood cells include stem cells mobilized from the bone marrow after injection with an FDA-approved mobilizing agent. These stem cells increase the total number of cells available in your blood and are a critical component in scientific studies.

Appointment Time: Approximately 1 hour for screening, 30 minutes for treatment (2-5 times on successive days), and 5-6 hours for white blood cell collection over 1 or 2 successive days— totaling 2-6 successive day appointments

Treatment Process: You will receive the injection per the required protocol.

Donation Process: White blood cells, particularly the mononuclear type of white blood cells, are collected from an arm vein by leukapheresis.

Leukapheresis is the process of removing whole blood from the donor, separating the blood into its components, keeping the white blood cells, and then returning the remaining blood components to the donor.

A nurse or phlebotomist will cleanse and sterilize an area of the arm from which the blood will be drawn. The blood is sent through sterile tubing into a centrifuge located in a cell-separator machine. The machine spins the blood to separate the white blood cells from the other components. The white blood cells are collected, and the remaining components are returned via the other arm. Only a small portion of blood is in the machine at any time (less than a cup). The entire procedure may take approximately 5-6 hours and is not uncomfortable.

Compensation: Up to $1000

Donating Step-by-Step

1. Contact us

Contact us. We will follow-up with you within 72 hours and conduct a prescreen interview.

2. On-site health screening

If you qualify to donate based on the pre-screen, a donor care specialist will coordinate an on-site health screening where your weight, blood pressure, and pulse are measured and your veins are assessed. We will also obtain a blood sample to see if your cell count falls within normal range.

3. Donate

After we determine you meet the eligibility requirements, we will contact you and inform you of the variety of donation options you qualify for. If you agree to participate in the program, we will schedule your donation appointment. Please remember to bring a valid government-issued photo ID (example: Driver License, Military ID, etc.) to your appointment.

4. Post-donation

Relax in HemaCare’s canteen area and enjoy refreshments while you recover.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Does HemaCare Do?

HemaCare is a blood services company serving the scientific community for over 40 years. HemaCare supports research and clinical trials, by collecting human-derived biological products from donors and supplying these donated blood products and cells to scientists to assist in the development of potentially life-saving therapies and treatments.

What are the qualification requirements to donate blood or bone marrow?

All potential donors must:

  • be at least 18 years old
  • weigh at least 110 lbs.
  • be in good health and feeling well
  • not be pregnant or breastfeeding

Qualifications vary for each donation. Contact us to see if you qualify and for what option.

I signed up to join your donor pool. What now?

Once you have submitted your contact information, a HemaCare donor recruitment coordinator will contact you within 72 hours to qualify you as a donor and discuss, in detail, your next steps.

  • First, there will be a 10-15 minute telephone screening interview with the HemaCare donor recruitment coordinator. The coordinator will ask you general questions about your health and medical history.
  • If you qualify to donate based on the phone pre-screen, we will schedule you to come to HemaCare for a 1 – 1.5 hour in-person New Donor Screening Appointment where you will fill out a questionnaire related to your current medical condition, health history, and lifestyle. We will also perform a brief physical examination to check your blood pressure, pulse, temperature, weight, assess your veins, and take a small blood sample to see if your cell count falls within normal range. You will not donate during this appointment.
  • After we determine you meet the eligibility requirements, we will contact you and inform you of the variety of donation options you qualify for. If you agree to participate in the program, we will schedule your donation appointment.
What should I bring at the time of donation?
  • A valid government-issued photo ID (driver’s license, passport, etc.)
  • A list of medications you are taking (our medical interviewer needs to know what medications you are taking or have recently taken)
  • A list of places you have visited outside of the U.S. in the past 3 years
I am taking certain medications--can I still donate?

Many medications are acceptable. Consult your physician or contact us if you have questions about your eligibility to donate.

What kinds of questions will be asked when I come to donate?

You will be asked questions about your health and whether you are at risk for certain diseases including AIDS, hepatitis, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and West Nile virus.

Will I be compensated for donating?

Yes, you will be compensated for your time spent donating. This compensation is based on the type of collection performed. For specific donor compensation amounts, please contact us to discuss an initial donor assessment.

What tests are done on blood?

Blood is tested for hepatitis B and C, HIV, syphilis, Chagas Disease, West Nile Virus, HTLV, and cytomegalovirus. In addition, it is tested for ABO group (blood type) and Rh type.

If I have a positive blood test, how will I be notified?

You will receive a letter from HemaCare Donor Center. In some cases, you may also receive a phone call.

How long does it take to donate?

It varies based on donation type. Click here to view our various donation types.

Can I get a disease from donating?

No, all of the materials used during your donation are pre-packaged, sterile, and disposable. Once they are used, they are discarded and destroyed.

If I was deferred once before, am I still ineligible to donate?

No. Please contact the HemaCare Donor Center for more information. We are always looking for healthy donors and deferred donors as scientists are always in need of various blood components for their studies.

How will my blood or bone marrow be used?

Biotechnology and academic institutions worldwide are researching human cells to find new ways to treat and cure disease, such as various cancers, diabetes, HIV, among others. Your donation will play an instrumental role in advancing these discoveries.

Will you release my contact information or use my identity?

No. All information you give to HemaCare is strictly confidential and will not be disclosed or released to any scientist, other company, or individual. All donations involve complete anonymity for the donor. We utilize randomly generated numbers to track products and there are no identifiers that can be traced back to you. Only your age, gender, ethnicity, blood type and other non-identifying information may be reported to the scientist using your blood or cells. We are dedicated to keeping your information private and confidential.